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720 Sunset Pond Lane, #2
Bellingham, WA 98226
USA

360-647-3395

True North Textiles is a boutique weaving studio producing original rugs that experiment with contemporary color and texture while remaining reverent to time-honored traditions. We specialize in working closely with designers and homeowners to develop palettes and patterns that integrate effortlessly and beautifully into interior design schemes. Our rugs are made in America

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Journal

Design blog focused on textiles, rugs and pattern.

 

Filtering by Tag: Hand woven

What's Prettier than Lavendar?

Angela Boyle

The completed lavender dining room rug is nearly 10x10 feet.

The completed lavender dining room rug is nearly 10x10 feet.

Ann Lundquist Design and the True North weavers teamed up for a recent project.

When people think purple, they think PURPLE. But this diverse color doesn’t have to be so bold. In this twill rug, lavender is combined with subtle rose and mossy browns. With the soft colors of a garden, this rug brings the outdoors safely in to the dining room where this rug will settle in.

You can just make out the mesmerizing angles caused by the twill and three colors.

You can just make out the mesmerizing angles caused by the twill and three colors.

The three unique color groups are woven one after the other. If you look closely, you can see that the cotton warp creates angled lines in one direction. But the three colors create angled lines to the other. A quick glance might see a floral lavender rug, but the more time you spend with it, the more depth of character is found.

With such subtle colors, it can be hard to select just the right combination. We offered up four color combinations, all focusing on lavender. The client was able to review the colors in their dining room. The lighting is so important in how the colors will look together. The colorway for one room with just a lamp can be very different from the best looking color way in a room with large south-facing windows.

Four color options let them pick the best colors for their lighting.

Four color options let them pick the best colors for their lighting.

This rug also has a unique finishing choice. Just because you choose a rug in one colorway, doesn’t mean the whole rug must be that color! The customer here wanted a concentration of the lavender on the ends. So to start and finish the rug, we wove 5 inches using only the lavender colorway. You can almost smell the heady scent on the breeze. Since we have six weavers at the shop, Our Creative Director, Amy Tyson, will often create a quick overview of the pattern we are trying to create. This helps keep all the weavers on the same track. Here you can see our plans for the lavender fields guarding the rug border.

Working from a design spec helps keep all the weavers with the same goal in mind.

Working from a design spec helps keep all the weavers with the same goal in mind.

Next time you think purple, think lavender. Then think rose. Then think of all the other colors in your own garden. Or the new garden you want planted in wool on your floors.

And don’t miss the inspiration for romantic Interiors at Ann Lundquist Design.

Heddle to the metal!

Angela Boyle, Weaver

Fiber Fusion

Angela Boyle

Review of a Local fiber fair.

Katie Haven of the McFarland Creek Lamb Ranch holds up some madder root, which was used to dye all the yarns in this image. Madder is very versatile for dyeing, ending up as anywhere from orange to red to pink to purple, depending on your dyeing process.

Katie Haven of the McFarland Creek Lamb Ranch holds up some madder root, which was used to dye all the yarns in this image. Madder is very versatile for dyeing, ending up as anywhere from orange to red to pink to purple, depending on your dyeing process.

On October 20 and 21, Fiber Fusion was held at the Evergreen State Fairgrounds in Monroe, Washington. Weavers Meg Lehinger and Angela Boyle attended this festival celebrating all things fiber from yarn producers and shops to individual local weavers and traditional artists in Laos and Vietnam to ranches and more .

Dyeing

McFarland Creek Lamb Ranch had beautiful fiber and wool that was dyed using natural materials. But even better, they had sample of their dye sources: from madder and chammomile to indigo and cochineal.

Looms

There were multiple inkle looms around the festival floor, but this example at the Horse 'n' Round Studio booth was stunning with its carved runes.

Above the Fray represents artists from Laos and Vietnam. They had many works on hand and were happy to discuss the traditional materials, methods, and motifs. The loom below with the fine, rusty-colored fabric (middle) at the Above the Fray booth has a very fine wooden reed.

Little House Rugs also had beautiful hooked rugs, which is a very different and artistic method of rug making. More time consuming, but more versatile, the rug yarn (or fabric) is pulled through a stiff, woven based, such as burlap. This allows you to create images similar to how the pixels on your monitor create images.

Animals

This is Chillin, an English angora buck. He is ready for a trim.

This is Chillin, an English angora buck. He is ready for a trim.

And so many animals! Purly Shell Fiber Arts brought in some rabbits. Based in Post of Ilwaco, WA, they have 75 rabbits, all of whom are handled with love and attention every day.

JNK Llama Farm brought their registered therapy llamas brought five to the show, and sometimes to the show floor! Their llamas cuddle their way through nursing homes, elementary reading programs, and more. And of course with all the fiber comes yarn to support the cause.

Of course there were a few sheep, but every knitters favorite, the alpaca, also made an appearance. The farm Alpacas from Mars was there in force. In addition to both Suri and Huacaya alpaca, they also brought their mohair goats.

Rebecca Suryan with a Suri alpaca. Suri alpaca grow silky fiber with no crimp that clings together in pencil-like locks.

Rebecca Suryan with a Suri alpaca. Suri alpaca grow silky fiber with no crimp that clings together in pencil-like locks.

Young Huacaya alpaca, they have a shorter, denser fiber that is crimped and teddy bear–like.

Young Huacaya alpaca, they have a shorter, denser fiber that is crimped and teddy bear–like.